2010年10月27日 星期三

Sony卡帶walkman日本停產

不敵數位潮流 Sony卡帶walkman日本停產

暢銷30餘年,賣出超過2億2千萬台,索尼公司(Sony)的經典商品卡帶隨身聽「Walkman」不敵數位音樂潮流,25日宣布在日本停產。存貨賣光後,市面上將再也買不到日本製的索尼卡帶式Walkman,只剩中國製產品繼續出貨。

索尼發言人中村紘子指出:「顧客聽音樂方式已轉向數位化,卡帶式Walkman的需求已減少,因此我們決定停止出貨。」
Walkman的誕生,來自索尼共同創辦人井深大(Masaru Ibuka )一次海外旅行時產生的靈感。他為了在旅途中聽音樂,帶著一台笨重的手提式卡帶錄放音機,於是想到發明一台體型輕巧、可攜帶式的播放器。

1979年7月1日,第一台卡帶Walkman問世,但當時不叫Walkman,而是「Soundabout」。上市第一個月時外界並不看好,市場反應冷淡,許多零售商認為這種卡帶隨身聽沒有錄音功能,成功機會相當渺茫。

然而消費者開始發現Walkman隨處可以聽音樂的好處,上市後2個月賣出3萬台,前10年賣出5000萬台,Walkman的成功使索尼一躍成為全球性電子產品大廠。

Walkman使聽音樂不再侷限一隅一室,不論慢跑或坐公車時,只要戴上耳機就能享受音樂。每個人也可以盡情聽自己喜愛的音樂,不會干擾他人。

2001年10月23日,iPod問世,為音樂播放再掀革命。苦撐多年後,卡帶式Walkman終究不敵

美聯社幫Walkman寫了一篇訃聞式報導,哀悼「活了31歲的Walkman」

EW YORK (AP) -- The Walkman, the Sony cassette device that forever changed music listening before becoming outdated by digital MP3 players and iPods, has died. It was 31 years old. Sony announced Monday that it has ceased production of the classic, cassette tape Walkman in Japan, effectively sounding the death knell of the once iconic, now obsolete device.
The Walkman is survived by the Discman (still clinging to life) and ironic music listeners who think using a Walkman in this day-and-age is charmingly out-of-touch.
It will continue to be produced in China and distributed in the U.S., Europe and some Asian countries. Digital Walkmans are also being made with models that display lyrics and have improved digital noise-canceling technology.
Still, if you're looking to chisel a date in the Walkman's tombstone, then Oct. 25, 2010, is as good as any. For many, that it's taken this long is surprising: "They were still making those?" Perhaps Oct. 23, 2001, the day the iPod was launched, is the better date of expiration.
But none of the success of Apple's portable music players would have ever happened without the cassette Walkman. Some 220 million have been sold since the first model, the TPS-L2, debuted in July 1979. (It retailed for $200.) At the time, transistor radios were portable, but there was nothing widely available like the Walkman.
It was developed under the stewardship of Sony founders Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka. Morita insisted the device not be focused on recording but playback, a relatively odd notion at the time.
Originally called the "Soundabout" in the U.S., the Walkman was an immediate sensation and a revolution in music listening.
Foremost, it was portable. Music no longer needed to be something that one experienced sitting in a room, but could be blasted on the bus, pumped while jogging on a beach or played softly while studying.
By turning the volume up, anyone could be tuned out.
The detached teenager with foam earphones slouched in the back seat or bobbing his head in the elevator became an indelible image of the `80s. (The first Walkman did have an orange "hot line" button to lower the music and increase the microphone so you could hear someone talking to you.)
Music, previously listened to in a room with shag carpeting and a stereo, was cast into the world, made a part of daily life. Pink Floyd could join a walk in the park, Public Enemy could soundtrack a commute.
More than portability, it fostered a personalization to music, a theme the iPod would also highlight in those early dancing silhouette ads. A big reason there's so much nostalgia for the Walkman today is because it eliminated any separation from music. It felt like an appendage, which is perhaps why some (with questionable fashion instincts) clipped theirs to their belt.
The Walkman was also the father of the mixtape, an offspring that nearly trumps the progenitor. For the first time, music was something you could make yours by arranging it and swapping it.
For those young and unfamiliar with this process, making a mixtape typically entailed gathering songs by the Cure and Depeche Mode, labeling the tape with care and awkwardly giving it to a love interest in homeroom.
The Walkman didn't disappear so much as it was improved upon. Sony continues to use it as a brand, but the company long ago ceded hipness and style to Apple. The iPod will likely one day befall a similar fate, and another generation will gasp in joined wistfulness.
When it comes to music and how we hear it, we're all romantics.

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